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LynneStringer

My Journey in Writing

My name is Lynne Stringer and I love writing! Of course, that’s not all I love. I also love reading books, especially ones that take me out of the every day and into a new world. It doesn’t have to be a completely imaginary world, either. Anything with fascinating characters and interesting storylines will do. My first young adult novel, The Heir, was accepted for publication by Wombat Books and released on 1 June 2013. It is the first book in the Verindon trilogy. It’s so exciting to have a real copy of my book in my hands.

SPOILER ALERT!
Eve: A Novel - WM. Paul Young

I haven't read The Shack, and have heard mixed things about it, but what I'd heard made me interested in trying this book to see what Mr Young had to say about creation.
I have to confess that it simply didn't engage me. If not for the fact that I had to read itto review it for someone, I would have stopped reading after the first couple of chapters. There's a lot talking, a lot of witnessing events from the bible (sort of), and I had to prod myself to keep going and not give up.
Most of what happens didn't cover anything that was new to me. I know the bible accounts. I'm familiar with alternative ideas of things related to Eden, to God having breasts, to the Holy Spirit being represented as female, etc. The thing that really got me was Eve being represented as the innocent party in the Fall, with Adam and the Snake conspiring to trick her, to such an extent that he's barred from Eden but she isn't. While I'm far from thinking that Adam was an innocent party in that story, painting him as the bad guy and Eve as the victim doesn't seem to have any justification, except to get her off the hook and put him on it.
Not to mention (on a story level), I always find it frustrating when a protagonist in a novel mistrusts everyone except the person who's clearly deceiving her and going behind others' backs, planting doubt in her mind. It's annoying because it's usually made so obvious I can't understand why the protagonist couldn't have pick up on it. That's the case in this book.
There were some passages that I enjoyed, particularly in the way the characters respond the presence of God, but it wasn't enough to make me feel that reading this book was a worthwhile experience.